Chapter 1: .. a Very Good Place to Start

"In the beginning was the word ... the word "in," as a matter of fact.


In mortal terms, it's inconceivable.

Nothing. Plenty of nothing, with no place to go. Or maybe it's everything. Regardless, there's no time, no space.

But the nothingness (or everythingness) bends a little and by that bend, space begins. By that beginning time starts. From that start...

"LET THERE BE LIGHT!"

And there was.

The light thought "Who said that?"

But then the light remembered it was non-sentient and stopped its uppity ponderings. It shone forth, but not ON anything.

At least the universe had lightened up a bit.

And somebody quipped back

"That's pretty biblical, buddy, and there's still more of the dark."

... and as the light shone forth from the darkness, the disembodied yet-not-disembodied voice of eternity happened to glance down at the immanent waters, and recognize its own reflection. "Man, I really look like S*** to eternity."

The Creator of the Universe yawned. "Don't bug me; I'm resting."

And that did it. The cosmic fly of identity had landed on the serene, mindless nose of eternity, and he stirred. Now, there were two of eternity, the one in the water, and the one out of the water. Pretty soon, the one in the water got out, looked at the two of them there reflected in the waters, and after an even briefer pause (being wet was losing its novelty), two more got out of the water, then eight, then sixteen. Occasionally, some would wander off, or just spend their time looking around at each other. But mostly, especially after the multiverse started getting crowded, and people couldn't easily push their way through the crowd away from the immanent waters.

And the clones were kind of like copies of copies on a bad copier. They were pretty useless. But the guy who'd started it all looked around, and sighed.

(As a result of this manic bifurcation, in later aeons, the work week would be 2 to the twelfth power days long.)

.. and back in our creation epic, nobody had gotten around to inventing the concept of names.